Chidren of Vietnam Blog

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A Post from the Stop Hunger Now Blog

After almost three weeks in Southeast Asia there are far too many highpoints and wonderful memories to make a complete list. But, with all the meetings and all the progress we have made on so many fronts, nothing compares with the time we got to spend with all of those folks who receive our Stop Hunger Now meals through Children of Vietnam. More than once each of us had to wipe away tears.

With every visit we made in Vietnam, it was deeply apparent that our meals make a life-changing difference. We made site visits to orphanages, social service centers and were even able to watch our meals being eaten by children suffering from defects caused by Agent Orange.

Even though the government of Vietnam works hard to provide for all those in need, Stop Hunger Now meals are critically needed to provide enought food for the needy. Our implementing partner, Children of Vietnam, does a truly remarkable job in distribiting our meals to help those most in need.

And our meals are not only enjoyed, every agency is requesting more meals. Most do not receive enough meals to provide meals every day. The following photos give a glimpse of how touching these visits were for all three of us.
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Thank you all for helpng make a difference in the lives of so many who live in such real and constant need. Working together we are changing the world.

 

 


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Article from East Asia Forum

Vietnam: will property rights solve land disputes?

Author: John Gillespie, Monash University

Something that was previously unthinkable has been happening in Vietnam in the last few years: prominent retired Vietnamese officials, national assembly deputies and bloggers are coming together to argue for private land ownership as a remedy for land disputes.

As in China, industrial parks, transport infrastructure and urbanisation is encroaching on Vietnamese farmland and sparking increasingly violent disputes with farmers. Calls for private ownership to increase famers’ property rights challenge one of the last remaining socialist tropes — ‘protecting the results of the land revolution’ (thành quả cách mạng về đất đai).


A big thank you to all of the Dining For Women Chapters who are supporting Children of Vietnam's Empowering Foundation for Women and Their Children this month! 

With your support, COV will be able to provide customized programs for single mothers living in poverty so that they will be empowered for a better future. 

Empowering Foundations for Women and their Children (EFWC)


Children of Vietnam 2012The Mission: Changing the lives of impoverished, homeless and handicapped children in Vietnam by addressing the root causes of poverty for vulnerable populations including impoverished single mothers with dependent children.

The Program: EFWC is a special initiative to promote income sustainability for struggling, single mothers. DFW will support 75 women through EFWC that will work to develop personal empowerment plans to lift families out of poverty through training, microloans, healthcare and improved housing.  DFW's goal is to provide a grant for $45,000 to be disbursed over a 2 year period.  

Why we love this program: This is a powerful program with an individual approach as these women face a myriad of barriers that trap them in poverty.   It requires a multi-faceted effort to confront the causes of poverty as a single solution often fails .  EFWC will work collaboratively with each woman to develop an empowerment plan by assessing needs, identifying strengths and defining personal goals.  Ultimate GOAL:  for each mother to be in charge of her future and to earn a stable income that sustains the family.

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Please check out this uplifting video put together by the Vietnamese Student Association at Ohio State University. Their Hold On To Hope video benefit's UNAVSA's 2012 philanthrophy- the Children of Vietnam's Hope System of Care

What gives you Hope? 

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Please check out this post from an adoptive mom who has become an advocate for children after a life changing visit to Vietnam! 
Heartwarming. 
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Check out the excitement on these kids faces when they were delivered vitamin-fortified meals!

COV distributes 855,360 of these meals at 2 cents per meal across Quang Nam Province. 

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Donate to COV's nutrition programs here


Want to see Saigon circa 1945? Check out this video! 

http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=eR1OIgftNvU

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Did you know? COV is working to alleviate malnutrition and stunted growth by distributing 855,360 of vitamin-fortified meals at 2 cents per meal across Quang Nam Province to rural kindergartens, orphanages, pagodas and rural hospitals. Find more about COV's nutrtition programs here

From Asia One News

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HA NOI - The Viet Nam General Nutrition Survey 2009-10 report, released yesterday, revealed that one out of three children under the age of five suffers from malnutrition, causing serious developmental defects.

The study also showed that the rate of pre-school children who are underweight is 17.5per cent, and that 29.3 per cent experienced stunted growth in 2010.

In other words, Viet Nam has 2.1 million stunted and 1.3 million underweight children.

Another alarming finding was that children in remote areas suffer the consequences of malnutrition at a rate twice as high as those who grew up in more developed regions of the country.

Other scientific studies have proven that the effects of malnutrition go beyond the potential growth rate of individual children, but can also have an impact on the social and economic development of the country.

Nguyen Viet Tien, Deputy Health Minister, said, "This study has provided a more comprehensive picture of the nutritional situation of families in Viet Nam. This information adds to a wider understanding of the importance of the issue to our country."

Other problems revealed by the survey included an obesity rate among children close to 6 per cent. In large urban areas, such as HCM City and Ha Noi, the rates are as high as 12-15 per cent.

Since 2006, the childhood obesity rate for children under five has seen a six-fold rise.

"We face two challenges. On the one hand, malnutrition remains a problem in much of the rural areas of Viet Nam, particularly in mountainous regions. At the same time, urban areas are facing the problem of childhood obesity. The situation requires quick action so we don't make the same mistakes as middle-income countries," said Tien.

The average rate of reduction was 1.3 per cent per year for stunted children and 7.1 per cent for underweight children from 1995 to 2010, according to the survey.


Children of Vietnam's staff in Da Nang was excited to be honored at a Da Nang People's committee last week where the organization received a Chairman's Merit Certificate for the good work COV does for the children of Da Nang. 
There were 23 awards given out all to government people and one to COV—the only charity.
Great job COV team- thanks for all of your hard work! 
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Make Agent Orange History featured the UNAVSA and COV's Hope System of Care in a recent blog entry. Check it out! 

http://makeagentorangehistory.org/unavsa-selects-children-of-vietnam-for-major-fundraising-effort/#comments

And here is some additional details about one of the HSOC benificiaries- Thien. 

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"Thien was born to a poor farming family. His father does odd jobs. His mother is afflicted with chronic asthma and liver cancer. The family is primarily reliant on subsistence farming with one rain-fed crop annually that earns them very tiny income.

When Thien was six weeks old, he suffered a cerebral hemorrhage. Hisyounger brother also suffered disabling health issues. Children of Vietnam’s Hope System of Care provided a comprehensive service  package to Thien and his family that included livelihood (a bicycle to his father to assist his job and a  micro-loan to his mother to raise pigs), housing improvements (a toilet, a kitchen upgrade, and installation  of clean water supply pipes). Thien and his brother also received health checks and monthly nutrition supplements.

More importantly, a public scholarship was awarded to Thien's brother and vocational training offered to Thien to learn incense making. When asked, Thien said he was very happy to live and learn a new job that can earn him some amount of money. Thien is such agood producer of traditional incense that he is now starting his own business at home involving his whole family."

 


Contact Us

PO Box 18039
Greensboro, NC 27419
Phone: (336) 235-0981
info@childrenofvietnam.org